A Healing Journey.


Seeing the photos of last year’s visit at The Farm at San Benito made my Saturday so serene and hopeful. Known for its Detoxification Retreats and Wellness Programs, The Farm at San Benito, in Lipa, Batangas, Philippines is an award-winning health resort located an easy 90-minute drive south of Manila.

the serene area where they hold yoga classes

It was a wonderful Saturday when I went there. As a yoga-lover, I felt the sense of belongingness in the place. The peace seemed to be from within; I breathed carelessly feeling that no polluted air will ever enter in my system.

this is the only thing I was seeing during the spa very relaxing treatment.
Spa and massage is part of my month! I’m having it twice a month and experiencing the spa treatment at The Farm was a very overwhelming experience. Everything that they used in my body was “edible” because they believe that we should be fair to our skin, being the biggest organ of our body, and give what it deserves with the same vitamins and minerals that we give to the rest of our body!
kids will definitely learn the art of flower arrangement and decoration!

Am I just pasted? or just completely wasted?

I had their Alive! Vegetarian 5-course Lunch.
I wasn’t able to talk the whole time I was eating. I was the best Zucchini with Basil Soup ever!
Everything was so lip-smacking and thinking about how they grew every ingredient of what I was eating and what they used in my body for massage was so astonishing and admirable.


All of us should realize The Farm at San Benito’s Philosophy:

“We believe in the body’s inherent ability to heal and maintain a healthy functioning state.
We believe disease is preventable and curable, naturally. We provide the environment, guidance and support you need to realize your maximum human potential. We believe detoxification regiments are highly effective tools in restoring health. We believe good nutrition is enhanced by increasing the intake of raw or “living” food, and may or may not include cooked foods and animal protein. We believe an investment in health will be one of your wisest decisions.”

Having won 18 international spa industry awards since 2004, The Farm has served as an inspiration to the Philippine tourism industry and benchmark for local spas in the country. It was awarded with the prestigious Asia Spa Award for Best Cuisine of the Year 2010. In 2009, CNN Traveller showcased the resort as one of the world’s best green places to stay in CNN Traveller’s list of Six Best Environmentally Friendly Hotels in the world. Its experienced team of integrated medical doctors, nurturing spa therapists, body-mind-spirit activity consultants, and “living food” chefs together with holistic approach to health has made The Farm one of the leading wellness destinations in the region.

Don’t forget to visit The Farm at San Benito when you visit The Philippines and have a healing journey!


At any time, you may request assistance for transportation or any other by calling the following numbers: 02-884-8074 (as to be dialed within the Philippines) +63-2-884-8074 (as to be dialed from outside the Philippines).

   You can also ask for assistance from iMarketing Japan, Inc & Philippine Primer Magazine at 7th Flr. Maripola Bldg. 109 Perea St. Legaspi Village, Makati City, or call +63.2.836.8381/ +63.2.808.2163.


The Farm at San Benito

119 Barangay Tipakan
4217 Lipa City, Batangas
 Philippines
Reservations: +63 2 884 8074
Cell (6am – 10pm):+63 918 884 8078
Fax: +63 2 889 1150 

Skype: reservations.thefarm/ medical.thefarm

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Reasons why you would want to tap the Japanese market in RP.



With all the panic in what’s happening in Japan nowadays, efforts of penetrating the Japanese market in different industries are now being withdrawn.   


Worries that it’s not a good timing to introduce or reintroduce their products and services to that very niche but rich market are in everyone’s discussion. But it’s different with Japanese, for them, Time is really gold. There’s no point of holding back, business is business. This explains why despite of what happened and what’s happening in Japan this month, Japanese arrivals in RP increased by more or less 1,000 and why the World Bank said that they expect the economic impact of the disaster on the East Asian region to be fairly short-lived.

Marketing and advertising with Japanese is quite different. They’re more into details and so much into maps (I was surprised how objective they are!). Here are some descriptions of the Japanese Market:

o   High Barrier entry due to language (English language capability is very limited)
o   Closed society with high potential but not yet fully tapped
o   Prefers and trust Japanese source more than English source
o   Conservative and do not take action unless familiar with the company  or recommended by a Japanese
o   Strong tendency to gather and want information as much as possible before taking action.

And the description of the Japanese Travel Cycle:





The total number of inbound visitors for January and February 2011 reached 668,625 for 17.88% growth compared to the arrivals for the same period in 2010.  This feat may be attributed to the growing confidence of the international market on the Aquino Administration.

In the first two months, Korea maintained its position as the biggest and top source market with 165,868 arrivals, with a share of 24.81% to the total visitor traffic, and growth rate of 35.22% vis-à-vis the previous year.

This market is followed by the USA with 17.05% share for 114,022 arrivals, Japan with 9.83% share for 65,755 arrivals, China with 5.77% share for 38,590 arrivals and Taiwan with 4.26% share for 28,461 arrivals.  Combined arrivals from these top source markets constituted 61.72% of the total inbound traffic.

India, Russia, Australia, and Canada were the fastest growing markets during the period with 74%, 36%, 22%, and 21% increase in visitor arrivals compared to 2010.


European markets, on the other hand, accounted for 11.08% of the total visitor traffic for 74,073 with the United Kingdom posting 8.48% growth and Germany recording 4.67% increase in arrivals.   The Scandinavian markets showed double digit growth while arrivals from France modestly increased by 4.67%.

The ASEAN market expanded by 13.70% for 49,634 arrivals with Malaysia and Singapore registering 20% and 16% growth rates, respectively.  The ASEAN market accounted for 7.42% of the total visitor arrivals during the first two months of 2011.

There are 17, 757 registered Japanese residents and expats in the Philippines according to Japan Embassy and there’s a growing number of Japanese tourists, who would not want to be known to the hard-to-penetrate-rich-market?

Turning Japanese: Celebrating Hina Matsuri!



Our Client Services team is an all-girls team. Luckily, I have BEAUTIFUL girls in the team and they’re all SINGLE. When our lovely president put the Hina Dolls at the top of the fridge and she said that we should be reminded to remove the dolls on the 3rd of March, everybody was so cautious because we know that according to their belief, if we’ll forget to remove them, we’ll not be able TO MARRY 😦


That is scary, I know. 


I just arrived from a business trip (from Cebu) when we celebrated the all girls’ day then, we had the “how to handle rejection” training. 
Definitely, ALL OF US WILL MARRY SOMEDAY. LOL.

It’s fun to wake up looking forward that you have new things to discover & experience.



We ate Chirashizushi made by our President, Ms. Jeri.


Here’s a gist of the festival’s history:


March 3 is Hina Matsuri (Doll Festival or Girls’ Festival), when people pray for the happiness and healthy growth of girls. Families with young daughters mark this day by setting up a display of dolls inside the house. They offer rice crackers and other food to the dolls.


The dolls wear costumes of the imperial court during the Heian period (794-1192) and are placed on a tiered platform covered with red felt. The size of the dolls and number of steps vary, but usually the displays are of five or seven layers; single-tiered decorations with one male and one female doll are also common. 


The top tier is reserved for the emperor and the empress. A miniature gilded folding screen is placed behind them, just like the real Imperial throne of the ancient court. On the second tier are three ladies-in-waiting, and on the third are five male court musicians. Ministers sit on either side of trays of food on the fourth step, and the fifth row features guards flanked by an orange tree to the left and a cherry tree to the right.

The practice of displaying these dolls on the third day of the third month on the traditional Japanese calendar began during the Edo period (1603-1868). It started as a way of warding off evil spirits, with the dolls acting as a charm. Even today, people in some parts of the country release paper dolls into rivers after the festival, praying that the dolls take people’s place in carrying away sickness and bad fortune. Most families take their beautiful collection of dolls out of the closet around mid-February and put it away again as soon as Hina Matsuri is over. This is because of an old superstition that families that are slow in putting back the dolls have trouble marrying off their daughters.